Skip to main content

Living well with dementia: a PhD programme to develop a complex intervention that integrates healthcare for people with dementia

Why is this research needed?

Health and social care are taking an increasing focus on dementia due to the rising population and the suffering caused to those affected in various ways by the illness. The complexity of needs that distinguishes dementia has to be addressed through a holistic and comprehensive approach to care. Although there are a variety of services in place to support individuals with dementia and their family, people find it difficult to access and navigate through these services. Furthermore, when the services are accessed there is an absence of continuity in long-term support, which has lead to failings in the care provided to the dementia community.

Previous research has looked at the provision of care, and how this can best be provided throughout the illness trajectory. One approach taken to improve the management of care provided to this population is the allocation of a health or social care professional to take responsibility of coordinating all aspects of care for the individual. These are known as organisational interventions and primarily focus on developing a collaborative process of planning, facilitating and coordinating care and providing a proactive support base for both the individual with dementia and their informal caregiver/families.

Method

This research project will look in detail at the design of these care interventions and evaluate their effectiveness in practice. The project will explore the views and perceptions of those involved in the care process, including individuals with dementia and their caregivers, with the overall aim of developing the optimum model of a community-based coordinating intervention for dementia.

Publications

Backhouse A, Ukoumunne OC, Richards DA, McCabe R, Watkins R, Dickens C (2017). The effectiveness of community-based coordinating interventions in dementia care: a meta-analysis and subgroup analysis of intervention components. BMC Health Services Research; 17:717

Backhouse A, Dickens C, Richards D, McCabe R (2015). Key components in models of community-based interventions coordinating care in dementia: a mixed studies systematic review protocol. Systematic Reviews  4:156-162

 

For more information, please read the protocol. If you’d like to learn more, please contact Amy Backhouse via Email

Upcoming Events

Jul
02

Searching and Review Clinic

South Cloisters 2.35, St Luke's Campus, University of Exeter

These clinics have been set up to help the PenCLAHRC Evidence Synthesis Team to manage and respond...
More information

Jul
02

PPI Advice Clinic

South Cloisters, St Luke's Campus, University of Exeter

Patient and Public Involvement Advice Clinics Held every month 30 minutes between 12pm-1pm Whatever your query, from...
More information

Calendar

News

Professor Tamsin Ford awarded CBE for services to psychiatry

17 June 2019

Tamsin Ford, Professor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at the University of Exeter Medical School...
Read more

Leading Plymouth University Dementia champion awarded British Empire Medal

10 June 2019

Ian Sherriff, Academic Partnership Lead for Dementia at the University of Plymouth and founder member...
Read more

How to improve outcomes for children and young people with long term conditions – the evidence is in

05 June 2019

Children and young people suffering with long term physical conditions can find anxiety and depression...
Read more

News

Research Projects

Social Prescribing - Understanding what works in, and supporting provision of, nature - based therapeutic interventions for people with an identifiable mental illness

Theme: Healthy People, Healthy Environments

We have been awarded funding from DEFRA to identify what works in the use of...
Read more

Social Prescribing - Cornwall and Plymouth Researcher in Residence

Theme: Healthy People, Healthy Environments

Evaluation work by a Researcher in Residence to assess implementation, reach, scope and acceptability of...
Read more

Research Projects