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Posts Tagged: Dementia

Dementia screening app wins national award

Posted on November 22nd 2018
in Project update

Dementia screening app wins national award

A Plymouth-designed app that helps to carry out dementia screening tests has been named a winner at the world's largest healthcare awards programme, the HSJ Awards.

In a record pool of 1,500 applications, ACEmobile, developed by Dr Craig Newman from the University of Plymouth and Dr Rupert Noad from University Hospitals Plymouth NHS Trust, was named the winner of the ‘Using Technology to Improve Efficiency’ category at the ceremony at the Intercontinental at London’s O2 on 21 November. 

ACEmobile is the first tool of its kind, supporting doctors and nurses through the whole process of a common dementia screening assessment known as...

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£2.7m study to focus on dementia support workers in primary care

Posted on October 25th 2018
in Project update, Research Funding

£2.7m study to focus on dementia support workers in primary care

A new study is investigating how to introduce dementia support workers into GP surgeries, with the ultimate aim of improving the quality of life for dementia patients and their carers.

Led by the University of Plymouth, the £2.7m study funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) will develop a person-centred package of care in GP surgeries, focused on the introduction of one dementia expert (support worker) to link to the rest of the patient’s clinical team. 

The research project is supported by PenCLAHRC and is being managed by Dr Val Mann, Associate Professor in Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry at...

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‘Floundering without support’ – a dementia carer’s story on why new research is vital

Posted on October 25th 2018
in Project update, Research Funding

Dorothy and Bob Tudor

Dorothy Tudor has cared for her partner Bob since he was diagnosed with dementia seven years ago. Watching the smiley, fun-loving carpenter transform into someone who no longer recognises her, Dorothy has been ‘floundering’ for support with nowhere to turn.

Here, she tells her story – and explains how introducing dementia support workers into GP surgeries could help ease the burden on people in a similar position. Dementia support workers exist in some organisations, but their role is not streamlined or consistent. New research to explore how to introduce them into primary care is being led by the University of Plymouth,...

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Stroke doubles dementia risk, concludes large-scale study

Posted on August 31st 2018
in Project update

Stroke doubles dementia risk, concludes large-scale study

People who have had a stroke are around twice as likely to develop dementia, according to the largest study of its kind ever conducted.

PenCLAHRC supported The University of Exeter Medical School’s study which analysed data on stroke and dementia risk from 3.2 million people across the world.

The study builds on previous research which had established the link between stroke and dementia, though had not quantified the degree to which stroke actually increased dementia risk. To better understand the link between the two, researchers analysed 36 studies where participants had a history of stroke, totalling data from 1.9 million people. In...

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EST dementia project covered on BBC Spotlight

Posted on May 16th 2018
in Project update

EST dementia project covered on BBC Spotlight

A project led by the Evidence Synthesis Team, which aims to improve our understanding of how best to help people with dementia and their loved ones in hospital, has been covered on BBC Spotlight.

The study, entitled “Caring about Care - Improving the Experience of Care for People with Dementia in Hospital”, is a partnership between The University of Exeter, Royal Devon & Exeter NHS Foundation Trust and Devon Partnership Trust (DPT).

“Caring about Care” aims to improve experiences of care in hospitals for people with dementia, their carers, and hospital staff. The research comes following a poll by Alzheimer’s Society, which showed that...

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Research reveals key factors to support quality of life in dementia

Posted on May 14th 2018
in PenCLAHRC people

Research reveals key factors to support quality of life in dementia

 

A robust research analysis has identified what factors can be targeted to support people to live as well as possible with dementia.

The study, led by the University of Exeter and published in the journal Psychological Medicine, found that good relationships, social engagement, better everyday functioning, good physical and mental health, and high-quality care were all linked to better quality of life for people with dementia.

Professor Linda Clare, at the University of Exeter, said:

“This research supports the identification of national priorities for supporting people to live as well as possible with dementia. While many investigations focus on prevention and better treatments,...

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Investigating the association between chronic heavy drinking and dementia

Posted on February 22nd 2018
in PenCLAHRC people

Investigating the association between chronic heavy drinking and dementia

PenCLAHRC researcher, Dr Iain Lang, has commented on a new study published in The Lancet Public Health, which provides evidence to suggest that people who drink excessively are putting themselves at serious risk of vascular dementia and Alzheimer’s disease.

Lead by Michaël Schwarzinger, MD, the study used the French National Hospital Discharge database to examine over a million people diagnosed with dementia between 2008 and 2013. More than a third – 38% of the 57,000 cases of early-onset dementia – were found to be directly alcohol-related and 18% had an additional diagnosis of alcohol use disorders. Alcohol use disorders were concluded...

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Results of GREAT trial released at Alzheimers Association International Conference 2017

Posted on July 19th 2017
in PenCLAHRC people, Project update

Professor Linda Clare

A large-scale trial led by the University of Exeter, presented at the international Alzheimer’s Association International Conference (AAIC) 2017 on Tuesday July 18, has found that cognitive rehabilitation leads to people seeing satisfying progress in areas that enable them to maintain their functioning and independence.

The Goal-oriented Cognitive Rehabilitation in Early-stage Alzheimer’s and Related Dementias: Multi-centre Single-blind Randomised Controlled Trial (GREAT) trial involved 475 people across eight sites in England and Wales. Half of them received ten cognitive rehabilitation sessions over three months, and the other half did not. The group receiving the therapy then took part in four ‘top-up’ sessions...

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PenCLAHRC dementia research makes the news

Posted on May 23rd 2017
in PenCLAHRC people

PenCLAHRC dementia research makes the news

A PenCLAHRC project showing that eating a Mediterranean diet may help reduce the risk of dementia has been reported in the Western Morning News as part of Dementia Awareness Week.

The systematic review, conducted by Dr Ilianna Lourida and Professor Jo Thompson-Coon of PenCLAHRC's Evidence Synthesis Team, brought together evidence to conclude that a Mediterranean diet could help to protect the ageing brain.

A Mediterranean diet typically consists of high consumption of plant foods such as fruits, vegetables, legumes and olive oil, moderate consumption of fish and dairy products, and reduced intake of red meat and processed foods. Moderate alcohol intake, usually wine, during meals is another...

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Want to stay mentally healthy in older age? Stimulate your brain in early life

Posted on April 20th 2017
in PenCLAHRC people

Want to stay mentally healthy in older age? Stimulate your brain in early life

Stimulating the brain by taking on leadership roles at work or staying on in education helps people stay mentally healthy in later life, according to new research.

Led by the University of Exeter and published in the journal PLOS Medicine, the large-scale study used data from more than 2,000 mentally fit people over the age of 65, and examined the theory that experiences in early or mid-life which challenge the brain make people more resilient to changes resulting from age or illness – they have higher 'cognitive reserve'.

The study found that people with higher levels of reserve are more likely to stay mentally...

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