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Research and Projects

What is the effectiveness of mindfulness-based interventions for teachers?

Theme: Person-Centred Care
Status: Live

Background

There is widespread recognition that work-related stress among teachers is a serious concern. The application of Mindfulness-Based Interventions (MBIs) has become increasingly popular, both in research and practice. Mindfulness involves learning to direct attention to experience as it unfolds, spending less time and energy focused on the future or the past. Mindfulness, as an approach, can be helpful for those coping with depression, stress, addiction and pain management. Previous research has noted that trials of MBIs for teachers appear to show beneficial outcomes, yet this has not been systematically reviewed to date.

Project aims

The purpose of this review is to synthesise randomised controlled trials of the effectiveness of mindfulness-based interventions for educational practitioners. Our research questions include:

  1. What is the effectiveness of mindfulness-based interventions for educational practitioners?
  2. What information about cost-effectiveness, integrity and acceptability is reported in RCTs?
  3. What factors may moderate the effectiveness of mindfulness-based interventions for educators?

We anticipate using a random-effects meta-analysis to determine the effectiveness of MBIs to improve mental health and work performance outcomes in educators. A narrative approach will be used to summarise any information about costs, feasibility, acceptability and any qualitative data collected alongside trials.

This project started in September 2015 and ought to be completed in February 2016. The team involves colleagues at the University of Surrey and University of Oxford.

Outputs

Please read the review for more information on the project's outcomes.

Related PenCLAHRC projects

Others Involved

Darren Moore, Naomi Winstone, Emily Papps, Daniel Racey, Willem Kuyken