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The NHS turns 70: Celebrating public involvement in health research

Posted on July 5th 2018
in PenCLAHRC people

The NHS turns 70: Celebrating public involvement in health research

On Thursday 5th July 2018, the NHS turned 70 years old.

Since its inception, the NHS has constantly evolved in response to changing needs, and has transformed the health and wellbeing of the nation. To commemorate this, our Patient and Public Involvement (PPI) team have created an animation encouraging public involvement in health research.

The team worked closely with Mary, a parent carer of a disabled child, and a member of PenCRU's Family Faculty. In the video, Mary discusses what persuaded to get involved in research, and why she would encourage others to do so. ​

Dr Kristin Liabo, Senior Research Fellow in the Patient and Public Involvement team, emphasises...

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Clinician-led research to inform new guidance for therapists

Posted on June 26th 2018
in Project update

Clinician-led research to inform new guidance for therapists

The results of a clinician-led study will inform a new evidence based guide for therapists prescribing sleep positioning systems for patients with neuro disabilities. It is hoped that this guide will help to outline the potential benefits and risks associated with the systems in practice as far as possible.

Sleep positioning systems (SPS) can be prescribed for adults and children with neuro disabilities to help reduce or prevent hip deformity, provide comfort, ease pain, and improve sleep.

Some clinicians have been recommending this type of equipment for many years, however, due to the lack of definitive evidence of the effectiveness of the...

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New research will evaluate ways to improve continence for disabled children

Posted on June 21st 2018
in Research Funding

Toilet signs

Learning to manage going to the toilet independently is an important milestone in child development. Being continent involves recognising that you need to go to the toilet, controlling until an appropriate place can be found, urinating and/or defecating, and cleaning up afterwards.

Children with special educational needs and disability may be slower to learn to manage going to the toilet, or need extra help, but many can become continent with the right support.  Clinicians often recommend ways to improve continence, including toilet training programmes, nappies and other products, aids and equipment, medicines and surgery. Children should be assessed carefully by clinicians...

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Hypnosis may help reduce distress of cancer treatment in children

Posted on June 19th 2018
in PenCLAHRC people

Hypnosis may help reduce distress of cancer treatment in children

Hypnosis could help to reduce the fear of medical procedures in children and young people with cancer.

New research has found promising evidence that hypnosis can reduce the distress associated with injections and other needle procedures, such as extracting bone marrow and giving chemotherapy. 

Previous research has shown that these procedures often provoke more anxiety in children and young people than the cancer itself. Up to half of children with cancer experience clinically significant emotional distress. This can cause additional anguish for the child and for their families and have a long-lasting impact on mental health.

Researchers from PenCLAHRC and the University of...

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PenCHORD: Helping the NHS make informed decisions using operational research

Posted on June 4th 2018
in PenCLAHRC people

PenCHORD: Helping the NHS make informed decisions using operational research

Deputy Director of PenCLAHRC, Professor Ken Stein, and Director of PenCHORD, Professor Martin Pitt, have written an article for The Operational Research Society’s Impact magazine, in which they discuss the ways PenCHORD research has informed decision making within the NHS.

PenCHORD (the Peninsula Collaboration for Health Operational Research and Development) are a team of Operational Research (OR) specialists, who aim to help healthcare professionals make informed decisions around organisational change. The initiative was established in 2008, and in the years since the team have worked with all of the trusts across the South West.

Professors Ken Stein and Martin Pitt have...

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EST workshop collaboration with CLAHRC North Thames

Posted on May 29th 2018
in PenCLAHRC people

EST workshop collaboration with CLAHRC North Thames

Members of the Evidence Synthesis Team (EST) have recently travelled to London to collaborate with CLAHRC North Thames on their ‘Beyond Searching’ Course.

Alison Bethel, Morwenna Rogers, and  Rebecca Abbot coordinated with Antonio Rojas–Garcia to deliver the workshop to 19 librarians from the NHS and various universities.

Beyond Searching was devised 5 years ago, and members of the EST have been running annual workshops ever since. It was designed to show health information professionals that they already have the skills to effectively contribute to systematic reviews, and to give them the confidence to get involved in the processes and to...

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CRN, McPin and MQ award for service user and carer involvement in mental health research

Posted on May 25th 2018
in PenCLAHRC people, Project update

 CRN, McPin and MQ award for service user and carer involvement in mental health research

The PARTNERS2 study has been awarded a CRN, McPin and MQ award for service user and carer involvement in mental health research. The Engager study has also been recognised with a highly commended runner up award.

The CRN, McPin and MQ award for service user and carer involvement in mental health research is a joint collaboration between NIHR Clinical Research Network, McPin Foundation, and MQ: Transforming Mental Health. It recognises the achievements of research teams which actively seek to involve patients and the public at each stage of the research process, and of service users and carers who are making a difference to mental health research.

This year's winners were announced at a...

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EST dementia project covered on BBC Spotlight

Posted on May 16th 2018
in Project update

EST dementia project covered on BBC Spotlight

A project led by the Evidence Synthesis Team, which aims to improve our understanding of how best to help people with dementia and their loved ones in hospital, has been covered on BBC Spotlight.

The study, entitled “Caring about Care - Improving the Experience of Care for People with Dementia in Hospital”, is a partnership between The University of Exeter, Royal Devon & Exeter NHS Foundation Trust and Devon Partnership Trust (DPT).

“Caring about Care” aims to improve experiences of care in hospitals for people with dementia, their carers, and hospital staff. The research comes following a poll by Alzheimer’s Society, which showed that...

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Research reveals key factors to support quality of life in dementia

Posted on May 14th 2018
in PenCLAHRC people

Research reveals key factors to support quality of life in dementia

 

A robust research analysis has identified what factors can be targeted to support people to live as well as possible with dementia.

The study, led by the University of Exeter and published in the journal Psychological Medicine, found that good relationships, social engagement, better everyday functioning, good physical and mental health, and high-quality care were all linked to better quality of life for people with dementia.

Professor Linda Clare, at the University of Exeter, said:

“This research supports the identification of national priorities for supporting people to live as well as possible with dementia. While many investigations focus on prevention and better treatments,...

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'At the top of the league table': Professor Stuart Logan on NHS priorities

Posted on May 4th 2018
in PenCLAHRC people

'At the top of the league table': Professor Stuart Logan on NHS priorities

PenCLAHRC Director, Professor Stuart Logan, has spoken to BBC Radio Devon about the problems behind lengthy wait times for non-urgent NHS operations.

Many NHS patients who require non-urgent surgery are finding that they are faced with longer and longer waiting lists. Over 300 people in the South West have now been waiting for treatment for over 12 months.  

In conversation with Janet Kipling on BBC Radio Devon, Stuart notes that this is because the NHS is under heavy strain as demand for resource increases.

“Fundamentally we just don’t have the kind of resources to be able to deliver the kind of health care that people...

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